Tours in English Tours in Spanish Tours in Portugues
Maria Eugenia Private Tours | Private Guide Tour in Russia
Home Page
Novgorod
Golden Ring
(Suzdal, Vladimir, Sergiev Posad, Kostroma, Yaroslavl)
Cruise tours
Baltic, Scandinavia and Germany
1 day tour
2 day tour
3 day tour
4 day tour
1 day tour
2 day tour
3 day tour
4 day tour
Train Sapsan

Deluxe private tours in Russia, all highlights of Novgorod

Novgorod

One of the oldest Russian settlements, mentioned in chronicles as early as 859, Novgorod served alongside Kiev as second largest trade center of the old Russian States. With the name literally meaning New Town, Novgorod is situated on the bank of the river Volchov, between St. Petersburg and Moscow somewhat at a distance of 250 km from St. Petersburg.

At all seasons of the year Veliky Novgorod welcomes guests with marry-making, fun, amusement and interesting events. Here festivals of folklore and crafts, children's theatres and national culture, the Cossack choruses and military-historical clubs, a bell holiday, motor rally take place. In spring pupils and students from ancient Russian and foreign cities gather for the piano contest named after Rakhmaninov S.V. and in autumn professional bell ringers and church choruses invite connoisseurs of a sacred music to the real spiritual art holiday.

To its visitor Novgorod is offering more than 50 objects of the old-Russian architecture of the 11th—17th century. The history of Novgorod’s cathedrals, monasteries and fortresses is tragic and beautiful at the same time. Novgorod’s icon painting, the legendary frescos and the unique archaeological discoveries rank amongst world’s cultural heritage.

For Sample prices please click here

ITINERARY for 1 full day trip

Schedule:

7:30 - Departure from Saint Petersburg.

10:30 - Arrival in Novgorod. Novgorod Kremlin, St. Sophia Cathedral.

13:00 - Russian themed dinner at "Yurievskoe Podvorie" («Юрьевское подворье») restaurant.

14:00 - Orthodox Churches of Novgorod, Yuriev Monastery, Khutyn Monastery, Open-air Museum of Wooden Architecture "Vitoslavlitsy".

17:30 - Departure from Novgorod.

20:00 - Arrival to Saint Petersburg.

Points of Interest

More information on St. Sophia Cathedral

St. Sophia Cathedral, built between 1045 and 1050 under the patronage of Vladimir Yaroslavich, the son of Yaroslav the Wise (Vladimir is buried in the cathedral along with his mother, Anna). It is one of the best preserved churches from the 11th century. It's also probably the oldest structure still in use in Russia and the first one to represent original features of Russian architecture (austere stone walls, five helmet-like domes). Its frescoes were painted in the 12th century originally on the orders of Bishop Nikita (died 1108) (the "porches" or side chapels were painted in 1144 under Archbishop Nifont) and renovated several times over the centuries, most recently in the nineteenth century. The cathedral features famous bronze gates, which now hang in the west entrance, allegedly made in Magdeburg in 1156 (other sources see them originating from Płock in Poland) and reportedly snatched by Novgorodians from the Swedish town of Sigtuna in 1187. More recent scholarship has determined that the gates were most likely purchased in the mid-15th century, apparently at the behest of Archbishop Euthymius II (1429–1458), a lover of Western art and architectural styles.

More information on Novgorod Kremlin

The Novgorod Kremlin, traditionally known as the Detinets, also contains the oldest palace in Russia (the so-called Chamber of the Facets, 1433), which served as the main meeting hall of the archbishops; the oldest Russian bell tower (mid-15th century), and the oldest Russian clock tower (1673). The Palace of Facets, the bell tower, and the clock tower were originally built on the orders of Archbishop Euphimius II, although the clock tower collapsed in the 17th century and had to be rebuilt and much of the palace of Euphimius II is no longer standing. Among later structures, the most remarkable are a royal palace (1771) and a bronze monument to the Millennium of Russia, representing the most important figures from the country's history (unveiled in 1862).


More information on Yuriev Monastery

The St. George's (Yuriev) Monastery is usually cited as Russia's oldest monastery. According to legend, the monastery of wood was founded in 1030 by Yaroslav the Wise (whose Christian name was George); the first historically reliable reference to it is from the early 12th century when the stone building of the main church (the Church of St. George, Georgieveskii Church) was started in 1119 by Prince Vsevolod Mstislavich of Novgorod and Pskov and Hegumen (roughly equivalent to a western prior) Kyuriak (Kirik) and built by the master Peter.

The monastery was ravaged during the Soviet rule. Five of its six churches were destroyed by 1928; the monastery was closed in 1929. During the World War II, the buildings were occupied by the German and Spanish armed forces, and were seriously damaged. In 1991 the monastery was returned to the Russian Orthodox Church, and parts of it have been renovated since then. However the western part, including a church there, are still in ruins.


More information on Khutyn Monastery

Khutyn Monastery of Saviour's Transfiguration and of St. Varlaam used to be the holiest monastery of the medieval Novgorod Republic. The monastery is situated on the right bank of the Volkhov River some 10 km north northeast of Velikiy Novgorod, in the village of Khutyn. The cloister was founded in 1192 by the monastery's first hegumen, the former Novgorodian boyar Oleksa Mikhailovich, whose monastic name was Varlaam. The main church of the monastery was consecrated by Archbishop Gavril of Novgorod the following year, the same year Varlaam died. He is buried in the main church of the monastery, the Church of the Transfiguration, to the right of the altar. He was the patron saint of Novgorod and the patrilineal ancestor of many families of Russian nobility, including Chelyadnins and Pushkins, of which Alexander Pushkin was a member.

During the first decades of Soviet rule the monastery housed a lunatic asylum. It was later a vacation home or hostel for visitors to the area. It was restored to the church in 1993. While for most of its history it was a male monastery, it is currently a women's convent.